Homeless People Plant a Huge Organic Garden, and Feed an Entire Shelter

A homeless shelter in Atlanta decided that their residents desperately needed access to healthy food—but instead of sourcing out, encouraged residents to grow their own.
By Heather Dockray / magazine.good.is
Aug 7, 2015
0
Homeless People Plant a Huge Organic Garden, and Feed an Entire Shelter

Organic vegetables and community gardens are typically associated with well-meaning, tote bag-carrying, volunteer at the Coop (and never miss a shift) types. But good, local, nutritious food shouldn’t be expensive, and shouldn’t only be enjoyed by people who can afford it.  A homeless shelter in Atlanta decided that their residents desperately needed access to healthy food—but instead of sourcing out, encouraged residents to grow their own. Now, the shelter is home to a huge rooftop garden planted by the residents themselves, which is expected to yield hundreds of pounds of great quality greens.

Eating healthy costs the average American an extra $550 dollars per year, with processed meats and snacks often priced disproportionately cheap. While eating discounted snacks might give homeless residents short-term financial benefits, the long-term health consequences are substantial. The Metro Atlanta Task Force for the Homeless, who runs the gardening program, wanted to give homeless people access to food previously considered out-of-reach. Now, residents are responsible for 80 garden beds, producing kale, carrots, chard, and squash, among other vegetables. A full meal, featuring freshly produced greens, is available on site every day.

Outside of the garden, the Task Force also provides a transitional shelter, a 24-hour hotline, and casework services.  Residents who participate in the gardening program also learn certifiable gardening and marketing skills—which the Task Force believes may help them find future jobs. To learn more about the organization and their awesome work, check out their site here.

Trending Videos
TraumaZone (2022)
350 min - An epic documentary by British director Adam Curtis illustrating in seven parts state and decline of the Soviet Union and the development in Russia 1985–1999 using material from the BBC archives.
What Is the Next Story? | Charles Eisenstein
15 min - Inspired by a Charles Eisenstein essay, crafted by Tonika Todorova and narrated by Charles.  Excerpts from the video: As we move into the third decade of the 21st Century, the power of story is...
The Pluralist Commonwealth: A Vision of Economic Democracy
5 min - Historian and political economist Gar Alperovitz offers an animated view of what a next system grounded in democratized ownership of the economy and real sustainability would look like. More info...
Schooling the World (2010)
66 min - If you wanted to change an ancient culture in a generation, how would you do it? You would change the way it educates its children. The U.S. Government knew this in the 19th century when it...
Grow Food Not Lawns!
What People Are Watching Now
How Conspiracy-Based Activism Leads Us Astray, Making Us Ineffective Agents for Change
Recommended

Films For Action hosts a subscription service that currently offers 55 highly-curated, solutions-oriented films to Patron subscribers donating $5 per month. 

Subscribe here. Your support helps grow our 5000+ video library, which is 99% free and contains no ads thanks to our patrons.

Cancel any time via your settings page.

 

How to Use and Contribute to this Library

  • Use the Explore menu to filter content by type and topic. Selections stack, so you can view Film Types about Specific Topics.

  • Submit videos directly to our library! Just sign up and click +Add Video at the top of the site and paste the video URL to get started. 

  • Create an account to save videos and articles for later and rate content for others

  • Filmmakers: Interested in our TVOD or SVOD services? Films For Action is one of the best homes for paradigm-shifting documentaries.

  • Contact us if you have a site or film suggestion, question, want to volunteer, or you're a filmmaker looking to collaborate. 

    Let's be the media!