Goa and the Monsoon
Goa and the Monsoon
By Stacy Green / filmsforaction.org
Jul 29, 2016

Welcome to Goa’s sandy beaches, the tourist companies say. You’ll enjoy the sand, and you’ll enjoy the waves. However, there is one thing that prevents foreigners from flocking on an all-Indian resort whole year round, and it is the monsoon. Monsoon is also known as the rainy period when the buzzing activity of the golden coast subsides, the tourists are not exactly flocking, and you can experience the beauty of Southern India all by yourself.

If you choose this unpopular time for your vacation, be ready to meet a lot of… Indian tourists in Goa! No Russians whatsoever (people say they love when it shines). It is humid and torrential in this part of India at the end of August, but the special, dim grandeur of the region adds expression to the overall cloudy landscape. Another useful advice for a first-time traveler would be to book hotel in advance, as the eager locals tend to occupy the nearest beaches even when it’s pouring. Incredible India! To meet more like-minded travelers, one should choose a simple hotel with no luxurious surroundings – they will only obscure the spectacular view of the sandy shore.

Despite the decline in local nightlife is obvious, some of the most active party lovers can still find pubs open, and the massive events take place in The Baga, Calangute and Candolim. Your every need will be catered in 24-hour restaurants, but our advice is to watch the weird-looking food – it is usually full of pepper and salt and spices a European traveler is unaware of. If you want to eat safely, turn to your hotel manager for help, so that you don’t have to worry about your dinner menu, as Indians are usually very cheerful and friendly. Help yourself with the fruit – they are incredibly delicious and exotic even for the monsoon time of the month.

According to the tourist impressions, some of the most beautiful sites Goa can provide is in the monsoon season, as the surroundings start to grow greener and greener, almost jungle-like. It is the first time you realize India is still unexplored, and wild, and natural in the most haunting and charming sense of the word. Moreover, going for a walk can prove a really unforgettable experience with all the luscious palm trees and unperturbed locals doing their business. It seems like India has the spirit of its own, and the more we see of it, the more we would like to discover. You can be all by yourself on the beach, and dive into the wildlife like a care-free downshifter. Here you go, travelers!

About the Author: Stacy Green is an independent writer at domyhomeworkfor.me do my homework for me, who spends most of her free time exploring the world. She believes it is the champagne of life, according to a very wise man, and she knows she has a lot to discover before she settles down in Ohio with her rocking chair and her grandchildren. Stacy Green is the lover the exotic, and she believes spiritual tourism is the most prolific one.

Related Articles:

1. CHARACTERISTICS OF WAVES OFF GOA, WEST COAST OF INDIA

2. Coastal Property Resources in Goa

0.0 ·
0
Trending Today
A New Browser Plug-In Lets You Access Millions of Scientific Papers for Free
Dom Galeon3,893 views today ·
The Western Idea of Private Property Is Flawed. Indigenous Peoples Have It Right
Julian Brave Noisecat2,602 views today ·
You Don't Publish a Million Secrets a Year Without Making a Few Enemies
2 min1,988 views today ·
Temporary Truce in a Democratic Party Civil War: The Sanders & Perez Unity Tour
16 min1,936 views today ·
Occupy Your Brain: On Power, Knowledge, and the Re-Occupation of Common Sense
Carol Black1,515 views today ·
17 Films That Make It Very Clear Our Economic System Is Killing the Planet
Tim Hjersted1,410 views today ·
25 Cheat Sheets for Taking Care of Yourself Like a Damn Adult
Anna Borges1,113 views today ·
How to Hug the Man That Killed Your Wife
Vegar Svanemyr1,064 views today ·
Today I Rise: This Beautiful Short Film Is Like a Love Poem For Your Heart and Soul
4 min1,056 views today ·
Load More
What's Next
Together: How Cooperatives Show Resilience to the Crisis (2012)
39 min
The Exile Nation Project: An Oral History of the War on Drugs (2011)
130 min
The One Percent (2006)
80 min
Like us on Facebook?
Goa and the Monsoon