IPCC Climate Change Report In 18 Tweets
By Piers Forster / rtcc.org
Nov 4, 2014

Leading climate scientist Piers Forster explains what the IPCC synthesis really means in a series of tweets.

Can’t be bothered to read our #IPCC Synthesis report: here are the headlines in 18 tweets..

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Our effect on climate is clear; emissions of GHGs are highest ever. Climate changes have had widespread impacts on humans and nature

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Warming is unequivocal; observed changes are unprecedented; atmosphere and ocean have warmed, snow and ice reduced, and sea level risen

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Climate change has impacted nature and humans on all continents and across the oceans. The Earth is sensitive to a changing climate

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Changes in extreme weather are occurring. We have caused fewer cold days, more hot days, more high sea-level days and more heavy rains

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Continued emissions bring chance of severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts. Limiting risk needs substantial emission cuts and adaptation

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Cumulative CO2 emissions determine future warming. Future pathway depends on socio- economic development and climate policy

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Whatever we do temperature will rise some. Very likely more heat waves and heavy rains. Oceans will warm and acidify, plus sea level rise

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Climate change will increase risk to humans and nature. Risks are greater for disadvantaged people in all countries

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Many aspects of climate change will continue for centuries, even if emissions stop. Risks of irreversible changes increase with warming

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Adaptation and mitigation help manage risk. Emission cuts reduce risk and long-term cost of mitigation. They build climate-resilience

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Need additional mitigation to avoid severe, widespread irreversible impacts Mitigation has less risk, increased benefit from mitigation now

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Adaptation can help, but there are limits. More immediate adaptation actions can enhance future options and preparedness

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

We can likely limit warming to below 2°C if substantial emission cuts now and zero emissions by 2100. Challenge increases with delay

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

No single adaptation and mitigation option is sufficient by itself. Need cooperation at all scales integrated with other societal objectives

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Adaptation and mitigation helped by effective institutions, governance and investments with behavioral and lifestyle choices

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Adaptation options and their potential vary with region and sectors. Some have co-benefits or trade-offs. Challenge increases with warming

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Adaptation options and their potential vary with region and sectors. Some have co-benefits or trade-offs. Challenge increases with warming

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Mitigation made cheaper by integrating energy saving with decarbonization of energy supply, and reducing net emission from land

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Policies across all scales supporting technology development, diffusion and transfer, as well as finance can help

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

Climate change is a threat to sustainable development. But also brings opportunities. We need suitable governance structures

— Piers Forster (@piersforster) November 2, 2014

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IPCC Climate Change Report In 18 Tweets